Background.

Sketches by Boz

Telescopes, sandwiches, and glasses of brandy-and-water cold without, begin to be in great requisition.‘ is a quotation from Sketches by Boz, Scenes, Chapter 10 (The River).

Sketches by Boz is a collection of short pieces written by Charles Dickens and published as a book in 1836.

 

Context.

Charles Dickens describes the essentials of a boat trip down the River Thames.

Taken from the following passage at the end of the sketch The River:

When we get down about as far as Blackwall, and begin to move at a quicker rate, the spirits of the passengers appear to rise in proportion.  Old women who have brought large wicker hand-baskets with them, set seriously to work at the demolition of heavy sandwiches, and pass round a wine-glass, which is frequently replenished from a flat bottle like a stomach-warmer, with considerable glee: handing it first to the gentleman in the foraging-cap, who plays the harp—partly as an expression of satisfaction with his previous exertions, and partly to induce him to play ‘Dumbledumbdeary,’ for ‘Alick’ to dance to; which being done, Alick, who is a damp earthy child in red worsted socks, takes certain small jumps upon the deck, to the unspeakable satisfaction of his family circle.  Girls who have brought the first volume of some new novel in their reticule, become extremely plaintive, and expatiate to Mr. Brown, or young Mr. O’Brien, who has been looking over them, on the blueness of the sky, and brightness of the water; on which Mr. Brown or Mr. O’Brien, as the case may be, remarks in a low voice that he has been quite insensible of late to the beauties of nature, that his whole thoughts and wishes have centred in one object alone—whereupon the young lady looks up, and failing in her attempt to appear unconscious, looks down again; and turns over the next leaf with great difficulty, in order to afford opportunity for a lengthened pressure of the hand.

Telescopes, sandwiches, and glasses of brandy-and-water cold without, begin to be in great requisition; and bashful men who have been looking down the hatchway at the engine, find, to their great relief, a subject on which they can converse with one another—and a copious one too—Steam.

‘Wonderful thing steam, sir.’  ‘Ah! (a deep-drawn sigh) it is indeed, sir.’  ‘Great power, sir.’  ‘Immense—immense!’  ‘Great deal done by steam, sir.’  ‘Ah! (another sigh at the immensity of the subject, and a knowing shake of the head) you may say that, sir.’  ‘Still in its infancy, they say, sir.’  Novel remarks of this kind, are generally the commencement of a conversation which is prolonged until the conclusion of the trip, and, perhaps, lays the foundation of a speaking acquaintance between half-a-dozen gentlemen, who, having their families at Gravesend, take season tickets for the boat, and dine on board regularly every afternoon.

 

 

Have Your Say.

Give your view on ‘Telescopes, sandwiches, and glasses of brandy-and-water cold without, begin to be in great requisition.‘ with a rating and help us compile the very best Charles Dickens quotations.

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars6 Stars7 Stars8 Stars9 Stars10 Stars (2 votes, average: 4.50 out of 10)
Loading...

 

 

Related.

If you like this, we think you might also be interested in these related quotations: