Background.

Great Expectations
  • My father’s family name being Pirrip, and my Christian name Philip, my infant tongue could make of both names nothing longer or more explicit than Pip. So, I called myself Pip, and came to be called Pip‘ is a quotation from Great Expectations (Chapter 1).

Context.

These are the opening lines of Great Expectations, introducing the character of Pip. The most important character in the novel, Pip is the protagonist and narrator of Great Expectations.

Image of Estella and Pip in later life, reflecting on their friendship.
Illustration of Estella and Pip in later life, reflecting on their friendship.

Literary Technique.

The use of the abbreviated name Pip is an example of the figurative language Dickens uses in his works, here using an aptronym. Great Expectations is a bildungsroman, a literary genre that focuses on the psychological and moral growth of the protagonist from youth to adulthood. A pip is a small seed that will grow and develop into something bigger. During the story of Great Expectations, the protagonist Pip will grow and develop from a small boy into a man. Pip is also a palindrome, namely a word, number, phrase, or other sequence of characters which reads the same backward as forward.

Source.

Taken from the following passage in Chapter 1 of Great Expectations:

My father’s family name being Pirrip, and my Christian name Philip, my infant tongue could make of both names nothing longer or more explicit than Pip. So, I called myself Pip, and came to be called Pip.

I give Pirrip as my father’s family name, on the authority of his tombstone and my sister,—Mrs. Joe Gargery, who married the blacksmith. As I never saw my father or my mother, and never saw any likeness of either of them (for their days were long before the days of photographs), my first fancies regarding what they were like were unreasonably derived from their tombstones. The shape of the letters on my father’s, gave me an odd idea that he was a square, stout, dark man, with curly black hair. From the character and turn of the inscription, “Also Georgiana Wife of the Above,” I drew a childish conclusion that my mother was freckled and sickly. To five little stone lozenges, each about a foot and a half long, which were arranged in a neat row beside their grave, and were sacred to the memory of five little brothers of mine,—who gave up trying to get a living, exceedingly early in that universal struggle,—I am indebted for a belief I religiously entertained that they had all been born on their backs with their hands in their trousers-pockets, and had never taken them out in this state of existence.

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My father’s family name being Pirrip, and my Christian name Philip, my infant tongue could make of both names nothing longer or more explicit than Pip. So, I called myself Pip, and came to be called Pip.
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